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Updated. February 20, 2024 3:41:29

General Data Protection Regulation Definition, Meaning, What is GDPR in English, Hindi, Urdu, Tamil, Marathi and Bengali. fendiharis.com – ( Date. August 31, 2023 09:49:01 )

What is General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive set of data protection and privacy regulations introduced by the European Union (EU) to strengthen the rights of individuals regarding their personal data and to regulate how organizations handle and process that data.

GDPR came into effect on May 25, 2018, and applies to any organization that processes the personal data of individuals within the EU, regardless of where the organization itself is located.

The main objectives of GDPR are to give individuals more control over their personal data, harmonize data protection laws across EU member states, and set higher standards for data protection and security. This regulation outlines various principles and requirements that organizations must adhere to when collecting, processing, storing, and transmitting personal data.

It also grants individuals several rights, such as the right to access their data, the right to erasure, and the right to object to certain types of processing.

GDPR aims to strike a balance between protecting individuals’ privacy rights and enabling organizations to use personal data for legitimate purposes. It introduces strict rules for obtaining consent, mandates data breach notification within a specific timeframe, requires privacy by design and default in data processing practices, and imposes substantial fines for non-compliance.

In summary, GDPR is a landmark regulation designed to enhance the protection of individuals’ personal data and privacy in the digital age, while also promoting accountability and transparency among organizations that handle such data.

GDPR Meaning

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive data protection and privacy regulation that was introduced by the European Union (EU) in May 2018. Its primary aim is to provide individuals with greater control over their personal data and to harmonize data protection laws across EU member states.

GDPR applies to any organization that processes personal data of EU citizens, regardless of where the organization is located.

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Meaning:

  • in English: General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).
  • in Hindi: सामान्य डेटा संरक्षण नियमावली (जीडीपीआर).
  • in Urdu: جنرل ڈیٹا حفاظت تنظیم (جی ڈی پی آر).
  • in Tamil: பொது தரவு பாதுகாப்பு விதிகள் (ஜிடிபிஆர்).
  • in Marathi: सामान्य डेटा संरक्षण नियमित (जीडीपीआर).
  • in Bengali: জেনারেল ডেটা প্রোটেকশন রেগুলেশন (জিডিপিআর).
  • in French: Règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD).
  • in Cybersecurity: General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) focuses on the protection and privacy of personal data in the digital realm, imposing guidelines for organizations to ensure secure data handling and processing.
  • in Business: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) mandates how businesses collect, process, and protect personal data of individuals, ensuring their privacy rights are respected.
  • in Health Care: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) impacts the healthcare sector by imposing stringent rules on the collection, storage, and processing of patients’ personal and medical data to safeguard their confidentiality and privacy.

Understanding GDPR

Understanding General Data Protection Regulation GDPR:

  • Pronunciation: [jen-er-uhl dey-tuh pruh-tek-shuhn reg-yuh-ley-shuhn]
  • Origins: The GDPR originated from the need to update and modernize data protection regulations in the European Union to address the challenges posed by the digital age, rapid technological advancements, and the growing importance of personal data in various sectors.
  • Synonyms: European Data Protection Regulation, EU Data Protection Regulation.
  • Antonyms: Lack of data protection regulations, absence of privacy regulations.
What is General Data Protection Regulation
UNDERSTANDING GDPR – WHAT IS GDPR

GDPR Definition

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive data protection and privacy regulation introduced by the European Union (EU) in May 2018. It aims to provide individuals with greater control over their personal data and harmonize data protection laws across EU member states.

GDPR sets out rules and requirements for the collection, processing, and storage of personal data, as well as individuals’ rights related to their data.

Key principles and provisions of the GDPR include:

  • Lawful Basis for Processing: Organizations must have a valid legal basis for collecting and processing personal data. This could include consent, contractual necessity, legal obligation, vital interests, public task, or legitimate interests.
  • Transparency and Fairness: Organizations must provide clear and easily understandable information to individuals about how their personal data will be used. This information is typically presented in privacy policies or notices.
  • Consent: When relying on consent as a legal basis for processing, organizations must obtain explicit and informed consent from individuals. Consent must be freely given, specific, and easily revocable.
  • Rights of Individuals: GDPR grants individuals several rights, including the right to access their personal data, correct inaccuracies, erase their data (“right to be forgotten”), restrict processing, data portability, and object to certain types of processing.
  • Data Security: Organizations are required to implement appropriate technical and organizational measures to ensure the security of personal data they process. This includes measures to prevent data breaches and unauthorized access.
  • Data Breach Notification: Organizations are obligated to report data breaches to relevant authorities and affected individuals within 72 hours of becoming aware of the breach, unless the breach is unlikely to result in a risk to individuals’ rights and freedoms.
  • Data Protection Officers (DPOs): Some organizations are required to appoint a Data Protection Officer to oversee data protection activities and ensure compliance with GDPR.
  • Cross-Border Data Transfers: When transferring personal data outside the EU, organizations must ensure that the receiving country offers an adequate level of data protection. Standard contractual clauses or other legal mechanisms may be required.
  • Privacy by Design and Default: GDPR encourages organizations to integrate data protection measures into their processes and systems from the outset (privacy by design) and to only collect the data necessary for the intended purpose (privacy by default).
  • Fines and Penalties: GDPR introduces significant fines for non-compliance, which can be up to €20 million or 4% of the global annual turnover of the previous financial year, whichever is higher.

General Data Protection Regulation Examples

Examples of GDPR application might include:

  • Obtaining explicit consent from individuals before sending them marketing emails.
  • Allowing individuals to access their personal data and request its deletion from a company’s records.
  • Implementing strong security measures to protect customer data from unauthorized access.
  • Reporting a data breach to the relevant authorities and affected individuals within the stipulated time frame.
GDPR MEANING - GDPR DEFINITION
GDPR MEANING – GDPR DEFINITION

General Data Protection Regulation FAQ

What is the best definition of GDPR?

Definition of GDPR: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a comprehensive and stringent data protection and privacy regulation adopted by the European Union (EU) in 2016. It became enforceable on May 25, 2018. The GDPR aims to enhance the rights and control that individuals have over their personal data while imposing strict obligations on organizations that collect, process, or store such data.

What are the terms definitions of GDPR?

Key Terms and Definitions of GDPR:
Personal Data: Any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person.
Data Subject: The individual to whom the personal data pertains.
Data Controller: The entity that determines the purposes and means of processing personal data.
Data Processor: The entity that processes personal data on behalf of the data controller.
Processing: Any operation performed on personal data, such as collection, storage, retrieval, alteration, or erasure.

What are the 7 principles of GDPR?

The 7 Principles of GDPR:
1. Lawfulness, Fairness, and Transparency: Personal data must be processed lawfully, fairly, and transparently. Individuals should be informed about how their data is being processed.
2. Purpose Limitation: Data should be collected for specified, explicit, and legitimate purposes, and not further processed in a manner incompatible with those purposes.
3. Data Minimization: The data collected should be relevant, adequate, and limited to what is necessary for the intended purposes.
4. Accuracy: Personal data should be accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date. Inaccurate data should be rectified or erased without delay.
5. Storage Limitation: Personal data should be kept in a form that permits identification of individuals for no longer than is necessary for the intended purposes.
6. Integrity and Confidentiality: Personal data should be processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security, including protection against unauthorized or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction, or damage.
7. Accountability: Data controllers are responsible for complying with the principles of GDPR and must be able to demonstrate their compliance through appropriate documentation.

What is GDPR and its purpose?

Purpose of GDPR: The primary purpose of the GDPR is to provide individuals with greater control over their personal data in the digital age. It seeks to establish a consistent and high level of data protection across the EU member states, while also addressing the challenges posed by the global nature of data processing. The regulation enhances individuals’ rights, such as the right to access, rectify, and erase their personal data, and introduces stricter rules for obtaining valid consent for data processing. Additionally, the GDPR imposes significant penalties for non-compliance, which can include fines of up to €20 million or 4% of global annual turnover, whichever is higher, to incentivize organizations to take data protection seriously.