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How much does a Medical Biller make in the United States? The average salary for a Medical Biller in The United States Per Hour, Per Day, Per Month and Per Year.

Medical Biller Salary in United States

  • Per Hour: $23.33
  • Per Day: $241
  • Per Week: $778
  • Per Month: $3,013
  • Per Year: $42,548
  • Source: Indeed

Medical Biller Salary

Did you know that there are several ways to become a successful Medical Biller? And below is how.

How to become a Medical Biller

Here are the steps you can follow to become a medical biller:

  1. Education: Obtain a high school diploma or GED. While a college degree is not always required, having some post-secondary education can be beneficial, especially if you plan to pursue advanced roles in medical billing or healthcare administration.
  2. Medical Billing Course: Enroll in a medical billing and coding program or course. These programs are offered by community colleges, vocational schools, and online institutions. Make sure the program is accredited by a recognized organization, such as the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) or the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC).
  3. Gain Knowledge and Skills: During your training, you will learn about medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, healthcare laws and regulations (including HIPAA), medical coding systems (such as ICD-10, CPT, and HCPCS), insurance claims processing, and billing software usage. Develop strong analytical, communication, and computer skills as they are essential for the job.
  4. Certification: While certification is not always mandatory, obtaining a certification can enhance your job prospects and earning potential. The two main certifications for medical billing professionals are Certified Professional Biller (CPB) offered by AAPC and Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). To earn these certifications, you’ll need to pass an exam after completing your education or gaining relevant work experience.
  5. Gain Experience: Look for entry-level positions in medical billing or related areas, such as medical office assistant or medical records clerk, to gain hands-on experience. This experience will help you understand the practical aspects of medical billing processes and further develop your skills.
  6. Continuing Education: Stay updated with industry changes, new coding guidelines, and advancements in healthcare technology by participating in continuing education courses and workshops. Maintaining your certification may also require completing continuing education units (CEUs) periodically.
  7. Job Search: Once you have the necessary education, training, and possibly certification, start searching for job opportunities in medical billing. You can explore job openings in hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices, healthcare facilities, insurance companies, and medical billing companies.
  8. Networking: Join professional associations and attend networking events to connect with other medical billing professionals, stay informed about industry trends, and access career development resources.

Apart from how to become a Medical Biller, please also see what are the requirements and criteria.

Requirements and criteria to become a Medical Biller in The United States

Here’s an overview of what’s typically required:

  1. Education: A high school diploma or GED is usually the minimum educational requirement for entry into the field of medical billing. However, some employers may prefer candidates with post-secondary education, such as an associate degree or certificate in medical billing and coding from an accredited institution.
  2. Training and Certification: While certification is not always mandatory, it is highly recommended as it demonstrates your proficiency in medical billing practices and can enhance your job prospects. The two main certifications for medical billing professionals in the United States are:
    • Certified Professional Biller (CPB) offered by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC)
    • Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA)
    To earn these certifications, you typically need to complete a medical billing program, gain relevant work experience, and pass a certification exam.
  3. Knowledge and Skills: Employers look for candidates who have a strong understanding of medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, healthcare laws and regulations (such as HIPAA), medical coding systems (ICD-10, CPT, HCPCS), insurance claims processing, billing software, and revenue cycle management. You should also possess excellent attention to detail, analytical skills, communication skills, and proficiency in using computers and office software.
  4. Experience: While entry-level positions may not always require prior experience, having experience in a healthcare setting or related administrative role can be beneficial. Some employers may prefer candidates with at least 1-2 years of experience in medical billing or a related field.
  5. Continuing Education: Medical billing professionals are expected to stay updated with industry changes, new coding guidelines, and advancements in healthcare technology. Participating in continuing education courses, workshops, and seminars can help you stay current and improve your skills.
  6. Compliance: Medical billers must adhere to ethical standards, patient privacy laws (HIPAA), and billing regulations. Familiarize yourself with the legal and ethical aspects of medical billing to ensure compliance in your work.
  7. Professionalism: Employers value professionalism, reliability, and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. Demonstrate your professionalism through your communication, work ethic, and commitment to providing accurate and timely billing services.

Most common benefits for Medical Billers

401(k)
401(k) matching
Dental insurance
Disability insurance
Employee assistance program
Employee discount
Flexible schedule
Flexible spending account
Health insurance
Life insurance
Opportunities for advancement
Paid time off
Profit sharing
Retirement plan
Tuition reimbursement
Vision insurance
Work from home

If you have met the requirements to become a Medical Biller then it’s time for you to apply for a job at your dream company. Good luck. [ Medical Biller Salary in United States ]

How much do similar professions to medical biller get paid?

Check the below career pages for the detailed pay ranges for the similar professions to medical biller here:

Coding Specialist
Accounts Receivable Clerk
Auditor

Last Updated on 8 April 2024